Commissions

pre 1913 New York American Building on Columbus Circle, New York City: design work unknown. (Arts & Decoration, November 1938, p. 17; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1913 Woolworth Building, Cass Gilbert, architect, 233 Broadway, New York City: lower portion metalwork. (Arts & Decoration, November 1938, p.17; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1913-1916 Brooklyn Trust Company, York & Sawyer, architects, 177-179 Montague Street: design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1914-1917 Eugene duPont, Jr., Residence, “Owls Nest,” Harrie T. Lindeberg, Architect, 201 Owls Nest Road, Centreville, Delaware: molded sheet copper transom arch fitted with eagle above central glass portal at main entrance, mantel ornament with sailing ship. (Arts & Decoration, Nov. 1922, pp. 26-27; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 22-23; Coronet, October 1939, p. 36; H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 149, 306; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1915 Blessed Sacrament Cathedral, Henry A. Walsh, architect, 9844 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, Michigan: ornamental metalwork. (Detroit Institute of Arts, Arts and Crafts in Detroit, 1906-1976, p. 43; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1915 Thomas Frederick Vietor, Residence, “Linden Crest,” Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, 99 Rumson Road, Rumson, New Jersey: bronze window grilles with peacock, rooster, and maks; iron and bronze grille door surround, lead lantern, fireplace valance, gilt bronze coffered portico ceiling ornaments, bronze globes with owl finial, iron railings with bronze turkeys, (Arts & Decoration, November 1922, pp. 26-27; International Studio, January 1924, pp. 339, 341; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22; Randall Gabrielan, Rumson Volume I, 1996, p. 36; H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 152-157, 310; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1916 George Arents, Jr., residence, “Hillbrook,” Lewis Colt Albro, architect, Lincoln Lane, Rye, New York: molded sheet copper transom arch at main entrance, signed lower right Oscar B Bach Studios and dated 1916 on the central shield, matching copper hanging lanterns with bracket supports having exotic bird and vine decoration. (Abbe-Barrymore, Dictionary of American Biography, 1928, p. 137; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22).

1916 Nelson Doubleday, esq., residence, “Barberrys,” Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, Mill Neck (Oyster Bay), Long Island: front entrance door and lantern. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22; H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 193, 306; Robert B. MacKay, Anthony K. Baker, Carol A. Traynor, Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects, 1860-1940, W. W. Norton & Company, 1997, pp. 41, 42.)

1916-1917 Clyde M. Carr, esq., residence, “Wyldewood”, Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, 55 North Mayflower Road, Lake Forest, Illinois: diamond window grille with rooster, bronze door surround and transom arch with animal motifs, bronze side window grilles, bronze main entrance door with zodiac and other symbols, lead leaderheads dated 1916 and monogrammed CMC, lamp bracket. (Arts & Decoration, November 1922, pp. 26-27; International Studio, January 1924, p.340; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22; H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 183-187, 306; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1916-1932 Philip D. Armour, III residence, “Tangley Oaks,” Harrie T. Lindeberg architect, 900 Armour Drive, Lake Bluff, Illinois, design work unknown. (Coronet, October 1939, p. 36.)

1917 RJR House – Winston Salem (TBD)

1917 Mrs. Lisbeth Ledyard, residence, Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, Stockbridge, Massachusetts: specific design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22; H. T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 176, 308).

1917 George Frederick Humphreys, esq., residence, Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, Normandie Parkway, Morristown, New Jersey: main entrance transom arch with peacock motif over oak door. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach , c. 1938, p. 22; Harrie T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 225, 307).

1917 Frederick L. Lutz, esq., residence, “Laurel Acres,” Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, Oyster Bay, Long Island: transom arch and door surround at main entrance. (H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 167, 308; Robert B. MacKay, Anthony K. Baker, Carol A. Traynor, Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects, 1860-1940, W. W. Norton & Company, 1997, p. 43.)

1917-1919 Horace Havemeyer, residence, “Olympic Point,” Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, Islip, Long Island, New York: lead leaderhead dated 1917, bronze and Quezal glass hanging fixture?. (Arts & Decoration, November, 1922, pp. 26-27; International Studio, January 1924, p. 341; H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996; Harry W. Havemeyer, Along the Great South Bay: From Oakdale to Babylon – The Story of a Summer Spa, 1996, pp. 165-166, 307; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000; Robert B. MacKay, Anthony K. Baker, Carol A. Traynor, Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects, 1860-1940, W. W. Norton & Company, 1997, p. 44)

1918 John Sargent Pillsbury, esq., residence, “Southways,” Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, 2200 Stevens Avenue, Orono, Minnesota (Brackett's Point, Lake Minnetonka): two bronze fireplace screens with peacock designs, bronze bench, gothic corner shelves in conservatory, pool railings, planters, lighting, other miscellaneous metalwork. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22; H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 177, 309).

1918-1925 Herbert Coppell, esq., residence, “Cotswold,” Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, 1 Byrne Lane, Tenafly, New Jersey: peacock window grille, front entrance, oriel window, possibly casement window with medallions. (H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 131-133, 306).

1919 Albert Pick, esq., residence, 445 Sheridan Road, Winnetka, Illinois: wrought iron and bronze entrance door, and wrought iron door with bronze figures. (Arts & Decoration, December 1924, p. 4; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22; Caroline Thomas Harnsberger, Winnetka: The Biography of a Village, 1977, p. 47; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1919 Cranbrook School for Boys 39221 Woodward Avenue, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan: Four lead conductors for exterior of Cranbrook House; George Gough Booth Papers, Cranbrook Archives.

1922 Chase Hotel (Chase Ullman, esq.), Preston J. Bradshaw, architect, 4965 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri: bronze reading lamp with etched metal shade. (Arts & Decoration, October 1922, p. 440.).

c. 1922 Orson D. Munn residence, Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, Short Hills, New Jersey: design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22; Harrie T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, p. 309).

c. 1922 James A. Farrel residence, “Rock Ledge,” Edward Moeller, architect (1911); Leroy P. Ward, architect (1922), 40 Highland Avenue, South Norwalk, Connecticut: bronze window grille, main entrance door, transom, windows, iron serving table. (Arts & Decoration, November 1922, pp. 26-27; International Studio, January 1924, p. 338; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

c. 1922 George E. Learnard, esq., residence, “Beausite,” North Street, Greenwich, Connecticut: bronze and iron stairway (Arts & Decoration, November 1922, pp. 26-27; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22).

c. 1924 Gaylord Hotel, Walker & Eisen, 3355 Wilshire Boulevard, Hollywood, California: wrought iron and bronze gates and frame, 7’ bronze, silver and iron fountain. (International Studio, April 1924, p. xxix; Arts & Decoration, December 1924, p. 4; M. Price Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

c. 1924 West Side Savings Bank, 110 6th Avenue, New York City: design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28).

1925 Architectural League of New York, 215 West 57th Street, New York City: inner door of the club rooms in hand-wrought forged iron with bronze symbolic figures. (Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1926 cat. 105; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, 1928, p. 2; Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 2, 28; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1925 Lloyd Frank, residence, “Fir Acres Estate,” Herman Brookman, architect. Currently part of Lewis & Clark College, Portland, Oregon: Two bronze weathervanes, bronze lantern, bronze grille to servants entrance, four bronze dolphin shaped swimming pool ladders, lead oriel window, bronze balcony, bronze and oak door, fireplace valance, door hardware, stair rail, floor lamp. (Bach correspondence, Lewis & Clark archives; Country Life, June 1926, p. 112; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22).

c. 1925 Alan Levin, esq., residence, “Wynnewood,” Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: radiator grille-console. (Arts & Decoration, May 1925, p. 67; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

c. 1925 Charles S. Peabody, esq., residence, 141 East 72nd Street, New York City: entrance door of forged iron with bronze inserts, having peacock design. (Arts & Decoration, March 1925, p. 73; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 22-23; The American Magazine of Art, April 1928, p. 193; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

c. 1925 St. Mary’s Chapel, Cleveland, Ohio: main lighting fixture/chandelier. (Arts & Decoration, October 1925, p. 83; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 24; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

c. 1925 International Telephone & Telegraph Company, 41 Broad Street, New York City: design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28).

1925-1926 Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe Street, Toledo, Ohio: steel, bronze, and repoussé silver main entrance doors for new wing with symbols representing the arts and crafts. (Bach correspondence, Toledo Museum archives; Arts & Decoration, August 1925, p.65; Country Life, June 1926, p. 111; International Studio, June 1926; The Toledo News Bee, June 1926; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 6, 28; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p. 88; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000). Note: similar examples of these doors are now in the permanent collection of the Wolfsonian at Florida International University, Miami Beach, FL. (Christies New York, Important 20th Century Decorative Arts, March 24, 1990, lot 14; Wendy Kaplan, Designing Modernity: The Arts of Reform and Persuasion, 1885-1945, 1995, p. 336, cat. 168.)

1925-1927 Waite Phillips, residence, “Villa Philbrook,” Edward Buehler Delk, architect, 2727 South Rockford Road, Tulsa, Oklahoma: bronze railings in main hall, door in telephone alcove, and possibly two firescreens with matching andirons. (Bach correspondence, Philbrook archives; Account records of Percy French, French & Co., New York City, July 26, 1927, p. 9).

1925-1927 Masonic Level Club, Harry Knowles with Clinton, Russell, Wells, George, & Holton, architects, 253 West 73rd Street, New York City: chandelier and other metalwork in lobby, lighting in main dining room, grille gates separating main dining room for hallway, table lamps and chandeliers in Club Room, exterior globe lanterns at main entrance. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28; Bruno Bertuccioli, The Level Club, 1991, pp. 68, 74-82).

1925-1930 Temple Emanu-El, Robert Kohn, Charles Butler, Clarence Stein, architects, 1 East 65th Street at 5th Avenue, New York City: Beth-el Chapel sanctuary light and door to Holy Ark, possibly stair rail. (Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1930 cat. 67 & 70; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 24-25; Arts & Decoration, November 1938, p. 17; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1926-1930 Terminal Tower, Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, architects, Public Square and West Prospect Avenue, Cleveland, OH: Design work uknown, possibly interior lighting, grilles.

c. 1927 T.W. Phillips Gas & Oil Company, 205 North Main Street, Butler, Pennsylvania: specific design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28).

c. 1927 Temple Beth Israel, Herman Brookman, architect, 1972 North West Flanders Street, Portland, Oregon: specific design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 24).

c. 1927 First National Bank, 102-104 South Main Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan: chandelier, interior gate. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 28-29).

1927 Cranbrook School for Boys, 39221 Woodward Avenue, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan: bronze clockface for dining room, lead sculpture of an eagle. Also in the collection is a bronze & enamel smoking stand with ship finial from 1923. (The American Magazine of Art, April 1928, pp. 189; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 3, 28; R. Judson Clark, Design in America: The Cranbrook Vision, 1984, p. 156; Barbara Kapitman, Michael D. Kinerk, Dennis W. Wilhelm, Rediscovering Art Deco USA, 1994, p.94; Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS) Inventory of American Painting and Sculpture (IAS 65790027) ; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000; Forgers of Metal, George Booth & His Patronage of Metalcraft at Cranbrook, Cranbrook Art Museum Exhibition Catalogue, January 27-April 8, 2001).

1927 Harry F. Knight, esq., residence, Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect, Warson and Litzinger Roads, St. Louis, Missouri: window grille with bird motif, possibly awning over main entrance and trim over oriel window. (H.T. Lindeberg with introduction by R. Cortissoz & new introduction by Mark A. Hewitt, The Domestic Architecture of Harrie T. Lindeberg, Acanthus Press reprint 1996, pp. 137-139, 308).

1927 W.E. Scripps, residence, “Moulton Manor,” Clarence Day, architect, Lake Orion, Michigan: grille gate, iron and bronze door with oak framework, another door, and stair rail, Hunt lamp, steel sconces, door hardware. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, 1928, p. 10; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 20, 22-23; Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1928 & 1929, illustration, The American Architect, May 5, 1929, p. 590; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1927-1929 The Episcopal Church of the Heavenly Rest, Mayers, Murray & Phillip, architects, 5th Avenue and 90th Street, New York City: ornamental hinges of mild steel, pierced and engraved with applied bands of the same. (Architecture Magazine, October 1934, p. 207).

1927-1929 B.F. Jones Memorial Library, Brandon Smith, architect, 663 Franklin Avenue, Aliquippa, Pennsylvania: bronze and iron grille gates to adults’and children’s reading rooms. (Bach correspondence, B.F. Jones Memorial Library archives; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28; B.F. Jones Memorial Library, 1929-1979, 50th Anniversary booklet, 1979, back page).

1927-1929 Bank of New York & Trust Company, Benjamin Wistar Morris, architect, 48 Wall Street, New York City: double stair-rail, doors, (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28).

1927-1929 Williamsburgh Savings Bank, Halsey, McCormick & Helmer, architects, 4th & Flatbush, One Hanson Place, Brooklyn, New York: exterior large windows depicting the Continents (War?), zodiac letterbox of iron & steel, 3 sets of symbolic bronze grille/doors with blue, green & red enamel, iron hanging fixtures with globes, bronze & enamel frieze with panels depicting symbols of finance, ornamental bronze & enamel clock, small door, steel and bronze panel in alcove, bronze check desks fitted with lamps & calendars, bronze & enamel teller grates, counter around teller area. (The Metal Arts, May 1929, pp 189 – 195; pp 224-229; inner portfolio and plates; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 21, 28; Arts & Decoration, November 1938, p. 17; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1928 Christ Church Cranbrook, 470 Church Road, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan: treasury room door of repoussé steel, inlaid with silver and gold. (The American Magazine of Art, April 1928, p. 190; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, 1928, pp. 12-13; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 24; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1928 Cranbrook School for Boys, 39221 Woodward Avenue, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan: wrought iron gates executed by Bach after design by Eliel Saarinen. (Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28; R. Judson Clark, Design in America: The Cranbrook Vision, c. 1984, p. 156; Barbara Kapitman, Michael D. Kinerk, Dennis W. Wilhelm, Rediscovering Art Deco USA, 1994, p. 94; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000; Forgers of Metal, George Booth & His Patronage of Metalcraft at Cranbrook, Cranbrook Art Museum Exhibition Catalogue, January 27-April 8, 2001).

1928 John Henry Kirby, residence, James Ruskin architect, 2000 Smith Street, Houston, Texas: specific design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22).

1928 Kauffman T. Keller Building, Smith, Hinchman, & Grylles, architects, 243 Highland Park, Wayne Co., Michigan: specific design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22).

1928 Kauffman T. & Adelaide Keller, residence, Clarence Day, architect, 19800 Cumberland Way, Detroit, Michigan: specific design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22).

1928 A. G. Wilson, residence, “Meadowbrook Hall,” William Kapp of Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, architect, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan: forecourt gates, lantern, sundial, screen. (Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1929; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 22).

1928 B. Altman & Co., 5th Avenue at 34th Street, New York City: Eighth Floor Showroom, Exhibition of Twentieth Century Taste in the newer expression of the arts, September 17th 1928; office interior, tables, chairs, wall decorations in steel with combinations of marble and leather and decorative objects of pewter, stainless steel and bronze coated doors, figural screen. (Metalcraft, October 1928, p. 220-221; Paul Frankl, The Arts & Decoration Home Study Course Covering the Modern Movement as Applied to Interior Decoration and Kindred Subjects, 1929, page; The Literary Digest, January 12, 1929 p. 4, advertisement for Armstrong’s Linoleum floors; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1928-1930 Chrysler Building, William Van Alen, architect, 405 Lexington Avenue, New York City: interior metalwork, including chrome nickel steel cresting over directory board, main lobby; chrome nickel steel radiator grille under show window, main lobby, information booth, clock. (American Architect, August 1930, pp. 42, 45; Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1931 cat. 30; Arts & Decoration, November 1938, p. 17; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28; Alistair Duncan, Art Deco in America, 1942, p. 100; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1929 Herman F. W. Scharfenberg, residence, Clarence Day, architect, Grosse Pointe, Michigan: interior lighting fixtures. (this entry based on information from current owner)

1929 Congregation Rodeph Sholom, 7 West 83rd Street, New York City: bronze, gold and enamel door of Holy Ark (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B.Bach, c. 1938, p. 24).

c. 1929 Mausoleum of Ely Strook, esq., Benjamin Moscowitz, architect: mausoleum door. (Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1930 cat. 68).

c. 1929 Church (School) of the Blessed Sacrament, 3443 93rd St, Flushing, New York: plaque. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 24; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

c. 1929 First National Bank, 561 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, California: design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28).

c. 1929 National City Bank, 810 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, California: design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28).

1929-1930 Bank of Manhattan & Trust Company, Shreve & Lamb, 40 Wall Street: specific design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Crafsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p. 88).

1930 Daily News Building, Raymond Hood, architect, 220 East 42nd Street, New York City: office furniture made of chrome nickel steel, brass and aluminum (Metropolitan Museum of Art: Eleventh Exhibition of American Industrial Art, The Architect and Industrial Arts, 1929, p. 75; American Architect, August 1930, p. 47; Alistair Duncan, Art Deco in America, 1942, p. 100; J. Stewart Johnson, American Modern 1925-1940, 2000, p. 32; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1930 The Riverside Church, Henry C. Pelton together with Allen & Collens, architects, Riverside Drive and Claremont Avenue and 120th Street to 122nd Street, New York City: door, chapel pulpit, lectern, sanctuary lamps, window, wrought iron door to Christ Chapel. (The Riverside Church in the City of New York: A Handbook of the Institution and its Building, 1931, pp. 55, 57, 79, 127; Interior Architecture & Decoration, April 1931, Pp. 77-79; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 24; Arts & Decoration, Nov. 1938, p. 17; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

c. 1930 Circle Tower, Rubush & Hunter, architects, 5 East Market Street at Monument Circle, Indianapolis, IN: stainless steel with silver-plated and bronze ornamented elevator doors. (Good Furniture and Decoration, December 1920, p. 312; Barbara Kapitman, Michael D. Kinerk, Dennis W. Wilhelm, Rediscovering Art Deco USA, 1994, p.103). Note: At least two other known examples of these elevator doors exist, one created in 1936 for an exhibit of stainless steel for the Procurement Division of the U.S. Treasury Department, Washington D.C. (see entry below for Procurement Division). The other resides in the permanent collection of The Minneapolis Museum of Art, (Christina N. and Swan J. Turnblad Memorial Fund) Janet Kardon, Craft in the Machine Age, 1996, p. 173 . The doors first appear illustrated in Paul Frankl’s, The Arts & Decoration Home Study Course Covering the Modern Movement as Applied to Interior Decoration and Kindred Subjects, 1929 and later in Coronet, October 1939, p. 36).

c. 1930 First National Bank, 2 Chenango Street, Binghamton, New York: design work unknown. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28).

1930 Michael E. Paterno, esq., residence, J.E.R. Carpenter, architect, number 5010 at 60 East 42nd Street (Lincoln Building), New York City: “Florentine Door” in bronze repousse hand engraved and enriched with inlays of silver and gold. (Interior Architecture & Decoration, May 1931, p. 100; Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1931 cat. 28; Architecture Magazine, October 1934, p. 208.)

1930-1931 Suburban Bell Telephone Building, Harry Hake, architect, 7 East 7th Street at Elm & Plum, Cincinnati, Ohio: metal panels of telephone themes throughout, chrome nickel steel with bronze and enamel elevator doors, mailbox. (American Architect, August 1930, p. 43; Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1930 cat. 69; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, pp. 28-29; Barbara Kapitman, Michael D. Kinerk, Dennis W. Wilhelm, Rediscovering Art Deco USA, 1994, p.70; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1931 Earl Carroll Theatre, George Keister & Joseph Balbonay, architect/designer, 753 7th Ave and 160-66 50th Street, New York City: female nude in bronze for fountain at niche above stairs leading to lower lounge. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938 title page; Barbara Kapitman, Michael D. Kinerk, Dennis W. Wilhelm, Rediscovering Art Deco USA, 1994, p.162; William Morrison, Broadway Theatres: History & Architecture, 1999, pp. 208-217).

1931 Empire State Building, Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, architects, 350 Fifth Avenue, between 33rd and 34th Streets, New York City: duralumin, bronze & gold wall panel in lobby, duralumin lobby medallions depicting various materials and technologies of the building industry. (Architecture, October 1934, p. 207; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28; Arts & Decoration, Nov. 1938, p. 17; Alistair Duncan, Art Deco in America, 1942, p. 100; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p. 88; Barbara Kapitman, Michael D. Kinerk, Dennis W. Wilhelm, Rediscovering Art Deco USA, 1994, p.162; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1931 Radio City Music Hall, International Music Hall and Cinema, Raymond Hood & associated architects, 1260 Sixth Avenue: (exterior) four monumental plaques designed by Hildreth Meire with vitreous enamel, copper, bronze, aluminum, chrome nickel steel; (interior) bronze panels inlaid with black bakelite; bronze elevator doors for cinema; over door decorations for foyer. (Architecture, October 1930, Pp. 203-205; The Architectural Forum, July 1932, pp.1-8; October 1932, pp. 352-358; Alistair Duncan, Art Deco in America, 1942, p. 100; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p. 88; Barbara Kapitman, Michael D. Kinerk, Dennis W. Wilhelm, Rediscovering Art Deco USA, 1994, p.168; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000; The Guide to the Art of Rockefeller Center, Christine Roussel, 2006 p. 13, 23, 144.; Catherine Coleman Brawer and Hildreth Meière Dunn, Walls Speak: The Narrative Art of Hildreth Meière, 2009, pp. 67-68.)

c. 1931 Mausoleum of David Tishman, esq., Benjamin Moscowitz, architect: mausoleum doors in repousse chromium steel. (Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1931 cat. 29.)

c. 1931 La Salle du Bois Restaurant, 784 7th Avenue, New York City: painted wall murals (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 27).

1931-1932 S.S. Manhattan, oceanliner (Maiden Voyage: August 10, 1932): interior decorative metalwork including swimming pool rails and ladders, patio furniture, balcony railings, stair rails and lighting fixtures. (Manhattan - United States Lines Cabin Deck Plan, 1934; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 30; Coronet, October 1939, p. 36; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p. 88).

1932 S.S. Washington, oceanliner (Maiden Voyage: May 10, 1933): interior decorative metalwork including swimming pool rails and ladders, patio furniture, balcony railings, stair rails and lighting fixtures. (Manhattan & Washington - United States Lines Third Class Deck Plan, 1938; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 30; Coronet, October 1939, p. 36; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p. 88).

1932 Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, John Russel Pope, architect; Payne Whitney Gymnasium interior metalwork. (Arts & Decoration, November 1938, p. 17; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p.88; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1935-1936 New York City Department of Health, Charles B. Meyers, architect, 125 Worth Street, New York City: Main entrance, large exterior eagle & telamone lanterns, exterior medallions, possibly lobby sconces (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 29; Barbara Kapitman, Michael D. Kinerk, Dennis W. Wilhelm, Rediscovering Art Deco USA, 1994, p.165).

c. 1936 Procurement Division of the Treasury Department, Washington D.C. (c. 1936): polychrome stainless steel & bronze coated elevator doors, trim and grill work. (Library of Congress Photographs & Prints Collection, Theodore Horydczak Photographs #LC-H814-T-2305-024; Yearbook of the Architectural League of New York Annual Exhibition, 1936 cat. 700; Arts & Decoration, November 1938, p. 17; M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 26; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

Note: At least two other known examples of these doors exist, one created for the Circle Tower in Indianapolis, IN (see above entry for Circle Tower), the second resides in the permanent collection of The Minneapolis Museum of Art. The doors first appear in Paul Frankl’s, The Arts & Decoration Home Study Course Covering the Modern Movement as Applied to Interior Decoration and Kindred Subjects, 1929 and later in Coronet, October 1939, p. 36.

1937 Hearst Building, Julia Morgan, architect for remodel of entrance and lobby, 5 Third Street at Market, San Francisco, CA: bronze grille over main entrance door. The building was originally designed by the New York firm of Kirby, Petit, & Brown in 1909 and served as home to the San Francisco Examiner until the late 1960s. (M. Price, Design & Craftsmanship in Metals, the Creative Art of Oscar B. Bach, c. 1938, p. 28).

1937-1940 W.L. Hanley House, Sterling Road, Greenwich CT, Harrie T. Lindeberg, architect

1939 Rockefeller Center: La Maison Française, 610 5th Avenue: Bach had plans to display 13 1/2’ sculpture “The Spirit of Democracy” on 7th floor terrace near his showroom. The statue was executed but apparently never installed. (Rockefeller Center Press Release, April 8, 1939 for release on Sunday, April 9, 1939, Rockefeller Center Archives; The Art Digest, May 15, 1939, p.8; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p. 88; Heidi Nasstrom-Evans, Chronology of Oscar Bruno Bach's (1884-1957) Career, 2000).

1939-1940 Airlines Terminal Building, John B. Peterkin, architect, 80 East 42nd Street, New York City: four plexiglass wing-shaped shafts supporting a modern clock; polychrome stainless steel mural map of the world in niche above main entrance; possibly a zodiac frieze in lobby. (Interior Design & Decoration, March 1941, p. 41; Bach’s Obituary, New York Times, May 5, 1957, p. 88; Robert Stern, Gregory Martin and Thoms Mellins, Architecture & Urbanism between Two World Wars, 1987, pp. 704-705; Art Deco New York, David Garrard Lowe, 2004, p. 38).

EXHIBITION HISTORY:

1916 Architectural League of New York, Bronze Portrait Bust of Pauline Bach, pastel drawings of Dixville Notch, NH

1922 Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum as a Laboratory of Design: Sixth Exhibition of American Industrial Art: Current Work by Manufactures and Designers Showing Study of the Collections. Domestic furnishings

1923 Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum as a Laboratory of Design: Seventh Exhibition of American Industrial Art: Current Work by Manufactures and Designers Showing Study of the Collections. Domestic furnishings including library lantern, bronze mirror, console table, pair of torcheres, candlesticks, centerpiece

1924 Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum as a Laboratory of Design: Eighth Exhibition of American Industrial Art: Current Work by Manufactures and Designers Showing Study of the Collections. Domestic furnishings including mirror, table, candlesticks, lighting

1924 Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Exhibit of products, month of December

1925 Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Industrial Art: Ninth Annual Exhibition of Current Manufactures Designed and Made in the United States. Domestic furnishings including mirror, table, chair, box, andirons, candlesticks, lighting

1926 Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Industrial Art: Tenth Annual Exhibition of Current Manufactures Designed and Made in the United States. Domestic furnishings including sconces

1926 Art in Trades Club, 5th Annual Exhibition of Interior Decorative Art, Hotel Waldorf-Astoria

1928 B. Altman & Co., 5th Avenue at 34th Street, New York City (September 1928 – 1929): Eighth Floor Showroom, Exhibition of Twentieth Century Taste in the newer expression of the arts: office interior

1929 Metropolitan Museum of Art, Eleventh Exhibition of American Industrial Art: The Architect and Industrial Arts. Business Executive’s Office designed by Raymond Hood

1936 Procurement Division of the Treasury Department, Washington D.C. Stainless steel door, trim, and grille